• GHF CAT Team

Music in Me

Using your innate capacity to respond to music, this activity encourages you to learn more about yourself to enable increased confidence and self-esteem.


What you’ll need: Paper, pens and musical props (tambourine, maraca, keyboard and xylophone, or whatever is available - improvise with pots and pans if you don't have any instruments)

What’s it for? This activity focuses on musical elements and how they connect us to ourselves. Even before we are born we are surrounded by the repetitive rhythm of the heartbeat, babies can recognise the voice of their caregivers from its tone or timbre, and children can have an emotional reaction to certain music from listening to it in the womb. Check In: Notice how you’re feeling right now. Close your eyes and notice what’s going on inside your mind and body.

  • How are you feeling?

  • What are you thinking?

  • How does your body feel?

Method:

  • Reflect and think about three of your positive features

  • Draw or write these features on three pieces of paper in big letters in different colours leaving room on the page to add other pictures and words

  • Now spend time on each attribute linking them to a musical element to focus on that characteristic in a fun and positive way

  • Let's start with TIMBRE which is the particular quality of sound that distinguishes musical sounds from each other:

  • In thinking about your characteristic can you put a particular sound to it, for example:

  • Playful - use of the tambourine or maracas with energy

  • Loving - use of a repeated low note either sung or played on a keyboard or xylophone

  • Play this a few times as you think about the attribute

  • Return to your piece of paper and draw or write the instrument or sound that was used and add to this any favourite or familiar timbres that make you feel happy and safe

  • Next let's think about RHYTHM which is the regular repeated pattern of movement or sound:

  • In thinking about your characteristic can you put a particular rhythm to it by clapping, tapping or singing each syllable of the word, for example:

  • Creative - break this into 3 syllables - Cre....a....tive

  • Resilient - break this into 4 syllables - Re....si....li....ent

  • Hold one hand to your heart and listen to the rhythm of the beat and then add your word with its rhythm to the pace of your heartbeat to make a connection

  • Return to your piece of paper and draw or write the rhythm that was used and add to this any particular rhythms that you might hear that make you feel energised and upbeat

  • Lastly let's focus on MELODY which is the series of pitches and notes to form a tune.

  • In thinking about your characteristic can you put a particular melody to it using familiar songs that you like:

  • Curious - 'Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Me, How Curious I want to be' [based on melody 'Twinkle, Twinkle']

  • Motivated - 'I'm only one call away, I'm feeling motivated today' [based on melody by Charlie Puth - One Call Away]

  • Return to your piece of paper and draw or write the melody that was used and add to this any particular melodies that remind you of when you were younger or a time when you felt nurtured and supported

  • Now look at all 3 pieces of paper and the images and words that represent your positive attributes

  • If you want to share this with your safe adult or caregiver and then put it somewhere visible so you can access this everyday to remind you about the things that help you connect with yourself

Extra Activity: Make a composition for someone close to you, perhaps a friend or family member using the same techniques, but focusing on the other person's characteristics and traits and bringing together the timbre, rhythm and melody as one! When you’ve finished, spend a moment reflecting on the activity and ask yourself the following questions:

  • Did you connect more with timbre, rhythm or melody?

  • How did it feel to use different elements of music to think about your positive characteristics?

  • How did you feel about associating timbre, rhythm and melody with a particular time or memory?

  • Did this activity help you to identify positive attributes that you had never thought about before and why do you think this is?

  • How did it feel to focus and put an emphasis on your positive traits and what did you learn from this?

Conclusion: Experiencing music and the elements associated with music can support individual self development. Focusing on three of these elements can encourage you to take time to listen, to feel, to attune to and to make music that represents and connects you to who you are! Reminding ourselves of our positive attributes also helps us to build self-esteem and to feel more confident and open around others. Take a moment to notice how you are feeling at the end of this activity. Did you discover anything surprising? What can you take away to make you feel better about yourself from this activity? If you would like to, share something about your experience with this activity with someone you live with! Ask the person who looks after you to send us an email if you have any questions or comments about the activity, or would like to send us any pictures (info@catcorner.co.uk). Don't forget to subscribe for more fun CAT activities! Created by Sarah Kong © November 2021

Creative Arts Used: Music Psychological Areas Explored: Emotional Wellbeing, Self-Exploration, and Self-Esteem If you enjoyed this activity, you might also like: Colourful Composition: Write your own music using colourful cues. These activities could be done by children of all ages, but some may need the support of their parent or carer to read the instructions or complete the activity safely. This website was made by CAT Corner to help you explore your feelings through fun creative arts activities. The people using the website and the people responsible for them need to make sure they stay safe (full disclaimer on About page).

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